A Trip to the Library

Taking a rest day is not in my vocabulary. But after two weeks without a break, Rich was ready for a day off the bikes. He approached the subject carefully, suggesting a two night stay in College Station. Little did he know that I had already been eyeing the George Bush Presidential Library there, eager to visit it. A deal was struck. We were both happy.

Molly and Rich at Bush’s presidential library

Our timing proved to be unique. With Barbara Bush’s death just the day before, there was heightened interest in the library. Already the media was swarming the place, and preparations were in process for her burial there later in the week. Admission fees were waived, and ample volunteer guides were on hand to steer us through the exhibits and add personal notes of interest.

Entrance to Bush library

This was my first visit to a Presidential Library, but I already know it won’t be my last. I found the whole experience fascinating. I expected the exhibit to chronicle Bush’s years as President. What I didn’t realize was that it actually encompassed his entire life. It was a complete picture of the man, his background, his wife Barbara, his family, his career and his life principles. By the time I finished, I had gained a deep respect for both George and Barbara as role models as well as our country’s leaders.

I realized how little I really knew about Bush. I discovered the breadth of experience he had amassed before becoming President, and how each position prior to that one contributed to his depth of expertise and knowledge for the job. I found repeated messages about how he treated everyone with respect and continually reached out to others personally, resulting in his powers of diplomacy. And woven through it all was his commitment to family. From his firstborn to the large family photos with at least a dozen grandchildren, his and Barbara’s involvement in their lives never wavered. Nor did their devotion to community service. Above all his bravery in World War II, his political accomplishments, and his stint as President, my biggest takeaway is the constant drive to serve others that he and Barbara embraced.

I was impressed with the selection of themes for the numerous exhibits and the tasteful way they were presented. The numerous artifacts and photos wove a compelling story for each scenario. What I enjoyed most was that in addition to the informational write-ups, there were little “Did you know?” posts that delved into the thoughts, feelings and beliefs of George Bush and his family and compatriots. They contributed humanity and feelings to the exhibits.

Piece of Berlin Wall

A piece of the Berlin Wall, which came down during Bush’s Presidency

Molly and Bush’s limo

I had two favorite rooms. One was a replica of the Oval Office as it was in George Bush’s day. The docent pointed out that the desk was two sided. Best of all, they invited visitors to sit and pose in George’s chair. How could we could resist?

Molly in Oval Office

Second was the office George Bush used at Camp David. George himself narrates the description of various items in the office, including as mundane an item as his coffee cup warmer. I was amazed to learn that he spent three weekends a month there. What a blessing it was, mot only to have a place to retreat but to have space for family to join them. Equally important, George made Camp David available to other staffers during the week when it was not in use. Once again, his humanity reigned.

Camp David office

Exiting the building after spending over three hours there, it was impossible to miss the flags at half mast for Barbara. Just beyond, memorials we’re already being left for her. Not only flowers, but children’s books in honor of her untiring drive to improve literacy in our country. It was a very touching. A fitting closure for our unforgettable trip to the Library.

Memorials for Barbara Bush

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